HOW TO AVOID BEING A PUSHY MARKETER

AVOID BEING A PUSHY MARKETER

We all know one or two pushy marketers. Many of us are exposed to them on a regular basis and frankly put, it’s freaking annoying.

I come across these every now and then, most often on Facebook. Honestly, sometimes I find it really hard to believe that people in this day and age still use the pushy tactic. You know, the one where they try to force you to sign up for their offer or buy their product even when you make it clear you’re not interested? I’m sure you’re familiar with it.

I mean it’s so sleazy and old fashioned, I just can’t understand who in their right mind thinks it will work.

Like when someone adds you to their Facebook group without permission, which you have no interest in whatsoever. For example, someone once added me to a group that was all about weight loss tricks. I for one have no interest in losing weight and for someone to outright assume that I do is quite frankly very offensive. I felt offended because it was like that person looked at me online and decided that I needed to lose weight. Maybe that’s not what they meant, but it’s how it came off anyway.

Or, when someone asks to be your Facebook friend only to force their offers or products down your throat. I mean, if I say I’m not interested, why push right?

Anyway, this post is not meant to be my outlet to vent, but rather, a reminder along with some suggestions of how to be a more thoughtful marketer.

 

So how can you avoid being a pushy marketer?

The old adage, Do unto others as you would have them do unto you” really applies here. I mean it’s really simple if you think about it. Whenever you think of marketing directly to someone in a specific way that you’re not sure about, ask yourself, how would you react to it?

If the answer is that you wouldn’t mind, go for it. But, if the thought of someone doing it to you makes you feel icky in any way, it’s probably not a good idea.

To make it even simpler, here’s a simple guideline to follow when you’re on social media.

 

  • Do ask permission before adding anyone to your private Facebook group. Instead of just adding their name, send them an invitation with a direct link to your group through messenger and let them decide if they want to join.
  • Don’t assume that everyone is interested in what you have to sell. Target your niche market only and be polite about it.
  • Do focus on them, not yourself when marketing. One thing many people forget is that marketing is not about themselves and what they want to say. It’s about your customers and what they might benefit from. Present your offer in such a way that speaks directly to their needs. But first, find out what their needs are instead of assuming you know what they need already.
  • Don’t hijack other people’s posts! I’ve had this happen to me a few times and I cannot tell you how incredibly annoying and inconsiderate it is. I’ve had them come on my Facebook timeline or Instagram feed and post their own completely irrelevant promotion on one my posts under the comments section. I mean, seriously? It doesn’t get any sleazier than that. Do not do this!
  • Do try to reply to all comments and questions on your posts. You want to encourage your followers to engage with you, so make sure to show them that you appreciate their comments by replying to them.

 

I believe if you follow these simple rules, you’ll be a lot more likely to make meaningful connections and attract real customers. Some people argue that you have to be pushy to get seen, but I do not agree with that at all.

Do you know what I do whenever someone does any of the above offensive actions? I BLOCK THEM, DELETE THEM, UNFRIEND THEM, FORGET THEM FOREVER. And I know that I’m not the only one who does that. So as you can see, sleazy marketing is definitely ineffective and can even get you in trouble because if you keep doing it, people will report you and you can lose access to a social media platform altogether.

There’s a difference between pushy and confident. What you want to practice is the latter.

Marta

BusinessMarta RaptisComment